Follow The Yellow Brick Road

We’re off to see the wizard, the wonderful wizard of Oz. Because, because, because because, because….because of the wonderful things he does! Remember that from the movie, “The Wizard of Oz”? Dorothy and her friends were off to find the wizard that would help them solve all of their problems and give them all of the answers to all of their questions about life.

Do you ever feel like you’re on that same quest? Following the yellow brick road from one clinic to another, from one clinician to another, trying to find the answers to all of your questions about horses? That’s not a bad thing. Getting information is important. Getting the right information is more important. Getting the right information that fits you and your horse is the most important! Sometimes it takes the right person saying the right thing at the right time for it to “click”.

Our experience was spending lots of time and lots of money being exposed to lots of ideas about horses and horsemanship. We listened, we learned, we experimented, we failed, we succeeded. We didn’t feel like we wanted someone to “give” us the answers. We wanted to use the information we gathered in our own setting and see what worked for us. We stayed with the things that fit our personalities and our abilities. We found that what really mattered to our horses wasn’t the techniques we used but, the feeling that came from the inside of us to the inside of our horse. As we got more sure our horses got better.

As this clinic season begins and you search for the right setting for you and your horse to get exposed to new ideas or refine some old ideas, pay special attention to what it is you want for you and your horse. Whether it’s a safe and relaxing trail ride or running a cow down the fence, the goals have to be yours. When you’re comfortable and confident your horse will be too!

Of course, we’d love to have the opportunity to work with you and your horse! Helping people find answers that fit them and their horse is one of the pure joys in our lives. We may not be the wizard you’re looking for but, we’ll always be honest about what we share with you and kind in the way we present it. Get more information about us and our clinic and lesson schedule at http://www.bridle-bit.com. We look forward to riding with you!

I Wish I Had Taken A Picture

How many times have we finished a project around the ranch and thought to ourselves, “I wish I’d taken a picture before we started”. It’s nice to see the end results but, the end result would mean all that much more if we had captured our starting point. We have our memory of what was but, that memory gets skewed by time and more recent events.

When working with horses, Tom Dorrance encouraged his students to remember and compare. Remember where you started and what you did so you can compare results. Knowing what happened before what you wanted to have happen happened and knowing what happened before what you didn’t want to have happen happened will help you decide what presentations are effective with a particular horse and which presentations you want to stow away with that horse. Remembering where you started, what you did, and what the results were allows you to develop better judgement through experience.

The other day we had a chance to work with some people and horses we hadn’t ever worked with before. The people were nice and the horses were good too. One horse in particular was the kind we like. He was smart and sensitive and not one to put up with much nonsense. He had come from a racing background but, his new job was on a cattle ranch. When we first got our hands on him he acted like he’d rather be in charge and tell us how things were going to be. His head was up, he led and pushed with his shoulder and he was tense from the tip of his nose to the bottoms of his feet. We should have taken a picture! After a little while and a little bit of offering a different feel, this horse just melted. His head came down, he accepted our leadership, and he got soft and willing. It made us feel good to be able to help him find something he was more comfortable with! Of course, we got a picture of that!

Resurrection

Yesterday, we Christians celebrated the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the tomb. He triumphed over death and in the process of crucifixion, death, and resurrection, gave us a pathway to a personal relationship with God. Without His sacrifice, our sin was in the way of that relationship.

I wonder how we can use that message and example in our horsemanship and in our lives in general. How many times have we felt that we have failed in something that we cared about. In essence we lost something. Maybe our confidence, or passion, or drive? Maybe it was a friendship or other relationship that we thought was solid until an event caused it to end abruptly? No matter what it was, no matter the cause, I wonder if part of the message of the resurrection isn’t, how do we resurrect what we lost?

Each of us will deal with that question in our own way. We need to allow ourselves to struggle through that process and find solutions that match our personality and situation. To me the important thing is that we get up each day and struggle. I believe that we find the answer that is right for us through faith that struggling will show us the doors that are closed and the door that is open. Without that struggle we wallow in a quagmire of doubt. By embracing the struggle, we find a sense of purpose. We develop a work ethic and confidence that there is an answer and we will find it! We turn the loss of something important to us into a new and important purpose. We resurrect our loss into something as good or better. Trust in your ability to go through the process. Have confidence that the answer is there to find.

Some of our horses are the same way. They have lost their confidence. Our job is to resurrect that confidence. We allow them to struggle through a process where they learn to find answers. We start with easier questions so they know they can find solutions and work toward the more difficult. We show them that we have faith in them. We show them that we have confidence that they can make it. Our faith and confidence in them will one day translate into a belief in themselves. What a great way to build a personal relationship!

Learning From Others

Tom Dorrance was a reader I’m told. He recommended books to his students that outwardly had little to do with “horsemanship” but had lots to do with becoming a better horseman. I’m guessing that Tom’s hope was that as people understood more about the animal kingdom and themselves, they would be better able to understand what goes on between them. We know from our experiences with people and their horses, as people change, their horses change. The horse reflects the human.

We took a trip to Arizona to see some family. Everyone is getting older and we don’t take the time to travel very much so, it had been 5 years since we’d seen an elderly aunt and my brother’s family. Our nephews are top level archers. They shoot compound bows and spend a lot of time drilling the center of targets with their arrows. These boys….young men…are in their teens and early twenties, highly intelligent, and spend as much time thinking about how to become better archers as they do practicing. As we visited about the mental aspects of archery and competition, they talked about some coaching they had been getting from an Olympic archer, Judi Adams, and one of her colleagues, Debbie Crews. Believe it or not, horses were involved in helping archers become more centered and more focused leading to better scoring. There was some pretty cool technology involved as well. One nephew was using a headset that helped him understand how to use his brain and thoughts to improve outcomes in his archery. And, that understanding is helping him in other areas of his life too!

Here are a few excerpts from an excellent article written by Judi and Debbie:

If you just believe in yourself, the arrow will go in the middle.” “You need to trust your shot.” “Confidence is the key to winning.” “If you have faith, it will all turn out okay.” How many of us have heard these words from our coaches, parents, and teachers? And how many of us answered, “But I am not confident, I am not sure how to believe, how can I trust myself when I keep messing up?

Trust is described as Confidence; Confidence is dependent on “belief which does not require proof” which is the exact definition of Faith. All these words are vague descriptions that we readily understand when applied to others we have observed, but we stress ourselves trying to inculcate them into our own being. And so it should not surprise us that the very struggle with attaining these concepts is linked to the fact that the words themselves are intrinsically plagued with doubt (a feeling of uncertainty).

To know is at the center of Confidence, Belief, Trust and Faith. It is clear that we are more confident, and have stronger belief, trust, and faith when we know. To know, assumes no uncertainty or doubt. What do you know? The more you know, the less doubt you have.

To see the whole article, we’ve posted it with permission at https://www.facebook.com/Bridle.Bit.LLC/ The diagrams in the article wouldn’t copy and paste so, if you’d like to see a version with the diagrams, email us and we’ll send you a copy.

The parallels between shooting an arrow well and riding a horse well were amazing to me. We hope you enjoy the article!

Your Horse Knows Who You Are

It’s one of those mornings where I woke up pretty tipped-up.  You know what I’m talking about if you’ve had a day where your spouse avoids you, the horses run to the other end of the corral when you approach, and your dogs lay in their beds and stay very, very quiet.  I’m one of those people that attempts to stay pretty even tempered.  I try to avoid allowing myself to rise with the highs and fall with the lows.  I fail miserably, and often, but, nevertheless, that’s my goal.  I’ve found over the years that it’s just easier for me to try to maintain the facade so I and the folks around me don’t have to deal with the goofball on a high or the man in the dumpster on a low.

The facade works pretty well with most people.  It doesn’t work well at all with most horses.  The horses I’ve spent time around have a keen ability to know exactly what’s going on inside me.  Sometimes they alert me to things going on inside that even I had failed to recognize.  I’m not educated in psychology but, after spending a good bit of time helping people with their horses and seeing the horses improve as the people improved, I know that there is a real connection between the inside of a human and the behavior of the horse.

We have the opportunity to work with a therapeutic riding program horses, instructors, and volunteers.  One of the big issues in a program like that is that the horses take on so much of what clients bring both physically and emotionally.  The horses get burnt out.  Not from the physical exertion of walking or trotting around an arena but, from the things that are going on inside the clients.  The horses are healers.  They are willingly taking the “stuff” from inside a client into themselves and find a way to deal with it.  Some are better than others at dealing.  We try to find ways to help those horses having trouble find an outlet for letting go of the “stuff”.

If we allow ourselves to heighten our awareness of our horses’ reaction to us, we have a better chance of recognizing who we are at that moment.  If we recognize who we are, we have the opportunity to make changes for the better.  Our horse is the most honest reflection of who we really are.  The good new for people like me is that I don’t have to remain who I am today.  I can work on me until my horse says, I respect what you’ve become. Let’s go for a ride!!

Timing

We had the opportunity to ride with some really great folks this past Saturday at our Winter Series, Refining Our Horsemanship Clinic.  Everyone was trying hard to understand what their horses needed from them.  Sometimes it was a doing a little more to get a horse to search.  Sometimes it was doing a lot less to give the horse the opportunity to show how much they can do for us.  We worked on becoming aware of when we had succeeded in getting our horse to think about what we wanted. Then, we  worked on the timing of our release for that thought.

When we rode in Ray Hunt’s clinics he would talk about how to look and feel for what it takes to get the horse to understand what we’re asking.  He talked about how sometimes it would take all we had to get our point across but, other times, it would take the littlest thing and they’d be right there.  To us, refinement in our horsemanship has taken the form of seeing how little we can do. Looking for ways to get our thought to become their thought.  Changing their mind and then getting out of the way so our horse can do our thing their way.  We’ve worked on becoming aware of our horses feet and how to get in time with them.

At the clinic, I watched Amy ride a horse that was struggling with his right side.  This gelding was always wanting to look left and pushing his shoulder and rib cage out to the right.  He is 10 years old and had been in this frame for quite a few years.  When Amy first began her ride she thought it  would take quite a little time to get him out of such a strong habit.  But, to Amy’s and our surprise, the gelding came through after just a little bit.  Amy’s timing must have been fitting to what the he needed.  She must have felt what the gelding was thinking he needed to do and changed his mind.  The straightness that Amy offered must have felt good to the him because once he knew through Amy’s release that it was okay to travel that way, he stayed there on his own.  Amy’s experience helped. She knew what she was looking for.  She would allow the gelding to run into his own pressure when he wasn’t right and would release as the gelding thought about getting right. Amy’s timing was good…..according to the horse!

Tom Dorrance and Ray Hunt showed us years ago that feel, timing, and balance were the keys to creating good communication with our horses.  It was true then, it’s true today.  We don’t need to look for anything else!

Make It A Good Day!

One thing that will keep you from getting into trouble with your horse is if you “ride the horse you have today”.  When we look back at a bad day with our horses, we may discover memories of signs that, had we paid attention, could have prevented our unpleasant encounter.  Being that horseman that has good situational awareness and adjusts to what is rather than what we wish for can mean the difference between a good ride and a bad one.

A “bad day” story may sound like:  Yeah, ol’ roanie was a little hard to catch that morning….I pulled him off the best, greenest pasture we have and away from that mare he’s so fond of.  There was a little ear pinning when I cinched him up but, when I rode him 3 months ago, he was fine.  He did walk off from the tie rack with his tail swishing and a big ol’ hump in his back but, when I moved him around a little he only kicked at the cinches once or twice.  Come to think of it, he did have a big ol’ brace on that left side….not good remembrances from a convalescent bed!

A “bad day” turned into a “good day” may sound more like this:  Yeah, ol’ roanie was going to be a little hard to catch so I took my time and made sure that he was catching me before we left the pasture.  A couple of days ago I noticed he was getting pretty attached to our mare so, I moved her to another pen hoping that would help today’s ride go better.  It had been most of the winter since we last rode so, I took some extra time with the grooming.  I kept ahold of roanie so I could move him around me and my brushes hoping he’d get a feel for me again.  When I put my saddle on his back, I took a little time to rub on him and I did a double check on how things were fitting since our last ride.  I brought those cinches up easy and just tight enough to keep the saddle from rolling and then I moved him around me a little to see what he thought about things.  I noticed a brace on that left side so, I took some time to work that out and make sure that left rein was working on that left hind foot.  By the time I was ready to step on, ol’ roanie had blown two or three times and yawned.  He looked like a horse that wanted to go with me.  We had a great ride!

As we all get ready for Spring, now may be a good time to start assessing our tack, our pastures, and our horses.  Getting back into the habit of thinking about what kind of situations we want to try to create to make our riding season one of the best ever!  Looking forward to seeing all of you soon!!

The Past Is The Past

We like to remember.  We remember our first good friend, our first teacher, and our first love.  We remember the folks that have helped us along our way and the folks that have not.  We hold on to those memories.  Sometimes they are in the forefront of our thoughts, triggered by an event or a song, smell or something familiar.  Other times our memories are hidden somewhere in the depths of our minds like an old friend we lost contact with.

Horses remember too.  They remember everything!  That’s why a good start in the halter leads to an easier start under saddle and a good start under saddle leads to a more confident horse in any discipline.  Horses remember how things feel.  They also remember being scared from a bad experience,  over confinement, or from the over use of force.  They remember how to fight when their flight response is taken away from them.

The good news is, most horses are very forgiving.  We know from working with hundreds of horses that have had less than a perfect life.  When these horses are offered something that feels good to them, something they understand, they find a way to bury the past.  They don’t forget, they forgive and bury.  If we offer them the things they understand in a way that makes them feel safe, they will choose to react in a way that helps us do our job.

A good horseman will do their best to forget any unfavorable encounters with the horses they work with.  We need to have confidence in our ability to learn from our mistakes and create better learning environments for our horse partners.  If we applied pressure in a way that caused a blow-up, we need to think of ways to get our job done without crossing that line again.  We look for the subtle signals from our horses that allow us to expose them to things they need to know and still stay on this side of trouble.  We also need to forgive and trust that given our new knowledge, everything will work out for the best.  We need to leave the past in the past.

New Beginnings

On a day when the high temperature is in the twenties and snow is in the air it’s hard to believe that Spring will be here soon. Spring brings with it the promise of new life and new beginnings. Foals and calves are born, flowers pop up from once frozen ground, and tree buds open to show us this years leaf crop.

Yesterday, we brought in the yearlings we’ll be running this year. That represents a new cattle beginning for us this year. Last years yearlings did their job of growing and getting bred. They’ll go on to become mother cows bringing new life to this world each spring. I went to the ranch that raised the cattle we bought to help them haul the cattle to our place. It was an opportunity to get a second look at the cattle we were purchasing and, even better, an opportunity to meet more of the people that cared for the cow herd and raised the calves. That’s where I met Kathy and her husband Ron.

Kathy and I got to talking about horses….imagine that! She has been riding her whole life. She was getting along fine but, attended a clinic given by a well known clinician who traveled to our area. She said it was like starting over. I know what she means! When Amy and I first met Ray Hunt, he could have been speaking Latin for all we understood. Kathy and I got to talking about how interesting it was that even an older horse could understand what we were saying when we got onto speaking their language. It was like a new beginning in our relationship! Kathy was experiencing that with her older gelding. The new language she was learning made sense to her gelding and he was liking the way she was talking to him. It doesn’t matter how old we are or the age of the horse we are working with, it’s never too late for a new beginning!

Black Beauty

This Black Beauty is such a nice quiet, gentle, kind part draft mare! Josie is a 2007 draft cross mare, her sire is a Shire/TB cross and dam is a 50% QH, 25% Morgan and 25% Percheron, standing 16-2 with a size 4 front shoe. She was bred and raised by the Mangus 5 Outfitters in Durango (www.themangus5.com) specifically for the family business of outfitting/packing and trail horse for their guests. The Mangus 5 specializes in drop camps for Colorado mountains north of Durango with elevations of 13,000-14,000 feet. She was used on the mountain trails in Durango as a riding horse and packing horse before our client bought her in 2015. This big hardy girl is looking for her new home and would love a job as a trail horse or ranch horse.  While she does well in the arena (she has been in dressage training with her current owner), she loves being out doing a job the best! She is good in the herd, easy to shoe, de-worm, vaccinate and is up to date on all. Her teeth were done Spring of 2017.  Her back is not typical of a draft and we found it easy to fit our wade saddle to her, she holds it well with her nice withers.  Josie is a very easy keeper and low maintenance kind of gal, currently grass hay and a handful of grain plus mineral is all she needs.  We are working with her to get her back in shape, adding more things to her current resume such as roping. She has been so accepting and has great try for all the things we have offered her so far! Contact us for more information or to set up a time to come check her out! $8500.00